Category: Sweden eats

Swedish food and food experiences on your holiday to Sweden.

Moist Carrot Cake Recipe

One of the nicest things in Sweden are their endless national pastry days. We had Cheesecake and Kladdkakka (chocolate cake) on my blog so far. Well, on the 3rd of February is Sweden’s carrot cake day. Naturally, Jakob and me had to meet up and make some carrot cakes!

So here comes the adapted version from inspiredtaste’s recipe as a base. We managed to make two small cakes out of the batter, six muffins and 12 flat small cookie muffins. You could probably make six additional normal sized muffins out of the flat ones.

Print Recipe
Moist Carrot Cake Recipe
carrot cake
Course Dessert
Cuisine German, Swedish
Keyword baking, cake, dessert, sweet
Servings
small cakes and 12 muffins
Ingredients
Carrot cake
Frosting
Course Dessert
Cuisine German, Swedish
Keyword baking, cake, dessert, sweet
Servings
small cakes and 12 muffins
Ingredients
Carrot cake
Frosting
carrot cake
Instructions
  1. Pre-heat the oven to 200° degrees.
  2. Prepare the cake batter: Mix all dry ingredients together. Add all remaining moist ingredients for the batter. Mix everything until the batter is even.
  3. Bake the cake at 200° degrees for around 35-40 minutes.
  4. While the cake is baking. Prepare the frosting. We had a rather fluid frosting since we used sour cream, if you want it to be denser, use cream cheese. Dense cake frosting: Mix the powdered sugar with the cream cheese. That's it. Fluid cake frosting sauce: Add the powdered sugar to the sour cream. Melt 100gr butter and add to the mixture. Put in the fridge until you are ready to frost the cake.

17 Swedish Food Souvenirs to bring back to your home country

Coming to Sweden and want to learn more about national food? Or leaving it soon and are thinking about what to bring back to your beloved ones for christmas? This food souvenirs guide might just be the right thing for you. Whenever I go abroad the thing I bring back for sure from abroad is food. So this time is no difference. These are mostly the things I will bring back to Germany as with me. So let’s see what we got here:

 

1.Cloudberry Jam (Hjortron)

Actually you don’t have to bring jam in particular. Get yourself some Cloudberry-anything when you can. Because Cloudberries are one of the most sought-after berries in Sweden.  They are usually only found growing in the northern wild because it is very difficult to create the right conditions to cultivate them commercially.

Bring some back to your country and add cloudberry jam, to your waffles together with whipped cream and you’ll have a perfect Swedish dessert!  Super delicious and a must-try taste of Sweden!

cloudberry jam
cloudberry jam

 

2. Swedish crisp bread (knäckebröd)

crispbread - knäckebröd

Knäckebröd is a flat and dry type of cracker mainly made out of rye bread. It’s one of Sweden’s staple food.

I won’t bring them back because it is fairly common in Germany but to the people who don’t have crispbread in their country: this is a great souvenir because if stored properly this bread can last for a very very long time (at least a year). It’s a great snack.

Knäckebröd by Wasa ©http://www.supermarktaanbiedingen.com
Knäckebröd by Wasa © www.supermarktaanbiedingen.com
Round Knäckebröd by Leksands ©www.made-in-scandinavian.com
Round Knäckebröd by Leksands © www.made-in-scandinavian.com

 

3. Swedish Creme (Kräm)

Blueberry kräm
Blueberry kräm from Willys supermarket

I haven’t really understood the concept of “kräm” yet. In my understanding it’s sth. of a compote or creamy pudding mostly made out of berries.

I picked up the blueberry one but I might pick up the rhubarb flavor as well because my friend told me it would taste heavenly with milk.

 

4. Swedish Tube Condiments

kalles swedish kaviar

The supermarkets have many sections for condiments in a tube. The most famous one is the Kaviar from Kalles. Get yourself some Swedish “Caviar”  if you way back home does not take too long. This Caviar should be cooled but it will survive if your flight does not take that long and you put it into a cooling bag.

The one from the brand Kallas, is the original one. I bought a fake one from Lidl ones because it was on sale and I was roasted by my Swedish housemates for that. I personally don’t taste a difference between the fake and the original one but oh well. And if you don’t have the option to cool it there are dozens of other tubes that that can be kept at room temperature. I got myself the cheese shrimp tube for example with is also very popular here.

 

5. Rose hip soup (Nyponsoppa)

rose hip soup
Swedish rose hip soup

Nyponsoppa is a Swedish classic made from rose hips. Rose hips serve as a healthy souvenir, since they contain a lot of the vitamins C, D and E, calcium and a load of antioxidants. 

The dessert is served with milk, cream or at best with vanilla ice cream. And as a finishing touch you topp it with  mandelbiskvier (almond macaroons). 

I got the instant package from Williys supermarket in Ersboda, Umea.

Instant Nyponsoppa powder  by Ekström

 

6. Swedish loose candy (Plockgodis)

Polkagris © tryswedish.com
Polkagris © tryswedish.com

Swedes love their sweets (lol pun intended). That does not only apply to their pastries but to their loose candies as well. Traditionally saturday is the day for children to buy them. Yes, as a kid in Sweden eating candy was only allowed on Saturdays.

Every supermarket in Sweden is equipped with these loose candy walls. And you’ll see many people from all age selecting candy from here. The selection is broad for everyone to find something: We’ve got every type of flavor and consistency from hardness, soft, or sweetness, saltiness, sour. Soft and chewy gumdrops dusted with sugar, milk chocolate, or even fish candies.

You can devide (Swedish) candy into 3 main categories: vingummi (wine candy), skum (marshmallow), and chocolate. Below are more specific examples on some popular brands here.

swedish food souvenirs to bring back to your country: candies
Swedish loose candies at Willys supermarket

 

7. Swedish “Marshmallow (Skum)”

swedish food souvenir
The original Julescum

I’ve specifically been told that the following  candies here are neither marshmallow nor are they all called “Skum”. But for a loss of a better description I dare to leave the title as it is with the risk of Sweden’s population being mad at me. But come on, how else should I call them?

So these candies are a kind of marshmallow gummies. They are not as sweet nor fluffy as marshmallows though. They come in different colors and flavors. Swedes really like it. The most popular ones are  the Bilar by Ahlgrens and JuleSkum by Cloetta.

From November on leading to Christmas Swedes get especially obsessed with  . the marshmallow Santa candy Juleskum . They are flavored with artificial strawberries and shaped like a santa, colored in pink and white. They are THE store bought thing to get during christmas! 

Juleskum can be found in any supermarket in Sweden before christmas. I’ve seen them at Ikea as well. And Bilar can be purchased at any time in all supermarkets in Sweden.

In Germany I know more people that don’t like these kind of candy than the ones that do though.

 swedish food souvenirs to bring back to your country: candies
Popular Billar scum by Ahlgrens
scum

swedish food souvenir
The Original Juleskum

 

8. Candy cane (Polkagris)

sugar canes ©istock

In my opinion Polkagris are your average candy canes known to most of us. But my housemates insisted that these Swedish ones from their originated city Gränna in southern-central Sweden are speccial. I haven’t had any from there so I wouldn’t dare to judge yet ;p.

They come in different flavors nowadays, the original one is the peppermint one in red and white though.

Polkagris ©www.polkagrisbagarn.se
Polkagris ©www.polkagrisbagarn.se

 

9. Chocolate

swedish chocolate brands: Aladin, Marabou, Carl Fazer
swedish chocolate brands: Aladin, Marabou, Carl Fazer

 

The most famous chocolates  are MarabouAladdin and Fazer. The two later ones are on the higher price end. If you want to get some pralines for christmas I would look at the ones from  Aladdin and Fazer. 

Another famous chocolate treat is the Swedish instant cocoa powder by O’boy.  It’s a Scandinavian childhood favorite and has been around since 1959. Mixes well with hot or cold milk 😉 Thanks Raphaella for the tip!

Chocolate Drink O'boy
Chocolate Drink O’boy from www.totallyswedish.com

 

10. Waffle (Kexchoklad)

Kex
Kex

Another popular product by Cloetta is their KEXchocolate, a crispy waffle covered in chocolate. I’ve been told that “it’s the essence of Swedish Skiing” because they are sponsored by Cloetta KEXchocolate. I’ve seen them at every supermarket and at the cafeteria at university.

 

11. Licorice (Lakritz)

salt

Licorice – You either hat it or love it. For Sweden it is the later. There is no doubting its popularity in Sweden, the supermarkets are filled with licorice flavored things like ice cream and candies which means that you will have your choice of what to take back home. The most popular candies brands are shown in the pictures:

licorice

licorice

 

12. Wine Gummies

Wine gummies
Wine gummies © candyfunhouse.ca

Wine gummies are definitively not the most Swedish thing to get but they are pretty popular in Sweden as well. They are similar to the British wine gummies, my friend loves them!

My Swedish classmate got himself this 1kg bag and devoured it within a day and he used to finish two of these bags back in the old days. If you still have space like me or your country is not used to them I would buy them. 

wine dummies from ICA supermarket
wine dummies from ICA supermarket

 

13. Ginger Biscuits (Pepparkakor)

pepparkakor
pepparkakor

Pepparkakor are thin and very crispy ginger bread cookies you will find during christmas season. In Sweden they are often paired with cheese and fruit, or just taken with a cup of coffee or a glass of cold milk. 

I personally am not a fan of super crispy and hard food and I much rather stick to the German version “Spekulatius” but I got myself one batch of Pepparkakor for my friends and family to try. 

 

 

 

the most famous pepparkakor are made by Anna
the most famous pepparkakor are made by Anna
great for sharing with friends and family

 

14. Göteborgs Ballerina

Swedish cookies
Swedish cookies

“Ballerina cookies have been considered Sweden’s favorite cookie since 1963. These delicious treats are circular in shape, are made from a shortbread cookie and have a chocolate hazelnut cream filling. “

I think most countries have a variety of these cookies from their own country but if you don’t you might want to pick up one of these. I have often seen these kind of cookies in Turkish and Russian supermarket. I bought a pack with three of these rolls at Willy’s to see if they taste any different to what I imagine them to be just in case.

 

15. Punschrullar

punschrullen
Swedish punschrullen © mittkok.expressen.se

This are Swedish Punsch-rolls, also known as dammsugare (“vacuum cleaner”). The inside consists of crushed biscuits, butter, and cocoa, flavoured with punsch liqueur. Outside it is covered with green marzipan with the ends dipped in chocolate. 

I wasn’t a fan of them at first, when I tried one from Coop supermarket but the packaged ones changed my mind. 

punschrullar
Punschrullar © Paul Hall

 

16. Swedish Chocolate Balls (Chokladboll)

Havregrynskugle

Chokladbollar are unbaked small treats consisting of oatmeal, sugar, cocoa, vanilla sugar, butter, and sometimes a small amount of coffee.

You can either buy them or make them quickly yourself. They are one of the easiest treats to make you don’t even need to bake them. You just mix all the ingredients together and you can eat it right after. 

Chocolatebollar by Delicato © hemkop.se
Chocolatebollar by Delicato © hemkop.se

 

17. Princesstårta

Swedish Princess Cake
Swedish Princess Cake

I won’t even start counting all pastries you could possibly bring with you from Sweden because there are a lot. But this cake is something I will bring back because it is THE Swedish layer cake so I included it into the list. 

Again, if your flight/train back doesn’t take too long you might be able to bring a slice of princess cake back. As always it’s a challenge but I’ve managed to do it with cake from Austria and Budapest so this will hopefully behave in my hand luggage as well. 

Sources

Swedish Wienerbrödets Dag

November has the most Swedish pastry days in the year. As a recap: In the first week we had the “Kladdkakans Dag“, in the second week “Chokladens” Dag and the third week “Ostkakans Dag“.

This week we are celebrating the Wienerbrödets! Every year on 22nd November is Wienerbrödets Dag!

Wienerbrödet …

is a multilayered, laminated sweet pastries. It is also known as “Danish pastry” in America. The concept was brought from Vienna, Austria to Denmark though. That explains why these world-famous sweet delights are called “wienerbrød” in Denmark and “wienerbrödet” in Sweden, translating to “Vienna Bread”.

Since the “Vienna Bread” were brought to Denmark in 1840 by Viennese chefs they have risen to popularity as a stable in Denmark.

And here in Sweden they are just as popular and deserve a day for themselves.

In Umea you can get them at the local supermarket (ICA, Coop and Lidl). But after trying all of them I can tell you that ICA (9,95 SEK) has the best ones, then Lidl (5,00 SEK) and the ones at Coop (6,90 SEK) are not crispy and blend.

Swedish cheesecake recipe – Ostkakans Dag!

Yet another Swedish pastry day has come. We had the Gustav Adolf Day, we had the Kladdkaka (chocolate mud cake) Day and today we have the Ostkakans (cheesecake) Day!!

Ostkaka literally translates to “cheesecake”. Do not confuse it with the American cheesecake though. It’s more similar to the German cheesecake (“Käsekuchen”). It originates from Småland, and there is a similar variant in Hälsingland.

 

swedish homemade oskaka cheesecake day

The Swedish dish has a firm consistency and subtle, creamy taste. It is usually eaten lukewarm with different jams, fruits, whipped cream or ice cream. I love eating freshly baked cake out of the oven or when it’s lukewarm, my friends prefer eating cake cold though. I often get weird looks for wanting to eat my cake warm so I am glad that you are actually supposed to eat Ostkaka warm. How do you prefer you cake? Tell me in the comment section 😉

Ostkaka is usually made by using rennet to milk and letting the its casein coagulateIn and then adding flour. In the following recipe we took cottage cheese as our base instead since its easier to purchase.

swedish homemade oskaka cheesecake day
Jakob gradually losing patience haha

The traditional version from Småland contains added almonds, bitter almonds, eggs, cream and powdered sugar. Its consistency is more grainy than in the Hälsingland version.

In the version from Hälsingland you do not use almonds. Slice the baked cake, add some cream to the cake slices and let the whole thing get warm in the oven. The cake is served with a berry sauce or with cloudberry jam and cream.

 

dinner

Baking Oskaka with Jakob
Baking Oskaka with Jakob
Sources


Print Recipe


Swedish cheesecake – Ostkakans Dag!

oskaka

Course Dessert
Cuisine Swedish

Servings
cake


Ingredients

Course Dessert
Cuisine Swedish

Servings
cake


Ingredients

oskaka


Instructions
  1. Set the oven to 175 °.

  2. Beat together eggs and sugar. Stir in the rest of the ingredients.
    swedish homemade oskaka cheesecake day

  3. Pour a greased ovenproof form and bake in the middle of the oven 35-45 min.

  4. Serve the cheese cake lukewarm and with ice cream and jam.
    swedish homemade oskaka cheesecake day

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